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Bollith Bred Poultry

Specialising in quality, free range poultry, perfect for your backyard

Breed Information

Breed Information

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Orpington

Posted by Bollith Poultry on 22 November, 2011 at 7:35 Comments comments (2)

Buff Orpington

 

Pros:
Large and feathery ~ Cuddly ~ Reasonable layers

 

Country of Origin:
England

 

Approximate Weight (Hen):
Approximate 2.5kgs

 

Eggs:
The Orpington may produce up to 200 good sized, brown eggs per year.

 

Colour Variations:
-Black
-Blue
-Buff
-White
-Cuckoo

 

History:
The Orpington is the classic example of a breed which has been dramatically changed, in both looks and performance, by its popularity as an exhibition bird.

Originally created in Britain in the late 1880s by William Cook, it was the Black variety which emerged first. It is believed to have been produced by crossing Langshan, Minorca and Plymouth Rock birds. Then, within just 8 years, Cook created the White and Buff forms. In the 1920s the Blue variety was created. These breeds were created as a successful dual purpose bird which would lay as many as 340 eggs per year, however exhibitors started crossing it with Langshans and Cochins in an effort to boost “show potential”. This cross breeding did make the Orpington bigger and more feathery, however it also completely undermined its utility potential and laying performance.

 

Personality:
The Orpington’s personality matches its looks: it is cuddly and docile. These characteristics make it a great ‘family’ bird and one which is tolerant of being handled, however this placid nature may mean it can be bullied by other birds.

 

Care:
The Orpington is a practical bird who enjoys the chance to forage however will also tolerate some confinement if necessary. It is a hardy bird and the hens make good mothers. Watch out for bullying if you decide to run this bird in a mixed flock.

 

Other:
Bantam versions also available
www.orpingtonaustralia.com for more information

 

 

Australorp

Posted by Bollith Poultry on 5 November, 2011 at 8:05 Comments comments (0)

Blue Australorp ~ Splash Australorp

   

Pros:
Docile ~ Quite ~ Great all rounder

 

Country of Origin: 
Australia

 

Approximate Weight (Hen):
Between 3 – 4kgs.

 

Eggs: 
There stories of fantastic laying records achieved in Australia during the breed’s development. One hen reportedly managed to lay 364 eggs in 365 days. On a more practical level, young hens should happily produce 200 eggs in a season, which is a great return. The eggs themselves will be of medium size and light brown in colour.

 

Colour Variations:
-Blue 
-Black
-White
-Splash

 

 

History:
The Australorp is a breed which has much to offer the domestic keeper but which is frequently overlooked by those who decide to opt for one of the more mainstream breeds. The breed was developed in Australia using, among others, the Black Orpington. The name “Australorp” represents a combination of Australian and Orpington. Great care was taken during the breed’s development to avoid sacrificing overall size while retaining good laying capabilities. Its popularity as a good-looking, dual-purpose bird has since spread around the world, and now it is universally – and rightly – regarded as a great all-round performer.

 

Personality:
The Australorp is a hardy, docile, and a good egg-layer as well as meat bird.

 

Further Information:
The Australorp is a large, soft-feathered bird which has two recognized colours according to the Australian Poultry Standard; black and blue. A third colour, white, is recognized by the Australorp Club of Australia but not the Australian Poultry Standard. The black Australorp is the most common, and has glossy black feathers and a lustrous green sheen. The blue Australorp however has a grey-blue plugmage and the white Australorp is a pure white bird.

Bantam version also available
www.australorps.com for more information  

Sussex

Posted by Bollith Poultry on 5 November, 2011 at 7:55 Comments comments (5)

Buff Sussex  ~  White Sussex

   

Pros:
Traditional favourite ~ Brilliant layer ~ Easy to handle ~ Inquisitive

 

Country of Origin:
England / Britain

 

Approximate Weight (Hen):
3.2kgs

 

Eggs:
A typical hen will lay around 200 good-sized eggs a year, however you might expect anywhere up to 260 light-brown eggs per year.

 

Colour Variations:
-Brown
-Buff
-Light
-Red
-Silver
-Speckled
-White
-Coronation

 

History: Sussex chickens are believed to have been first bred in Britain (in the area that was to become England) around the time of the Roman invasion of AD 43 making them one of the oldest known breeds.
The original colours were the Brown, Red and Speckled.
The Sussex originated from such breeds as the Brahma, Old English Game, Cochin and the Silver-grey Dorking

 

Personality:
The Sussex has a fantastic personality which is difficult to fault. These breeds are active and curious while also being gentle, friendly and easy to handle.

 

Care:
The Sussex is a relatively easy and undemanding breed to keep, which makes it a sound choice for the beginner. These birds love to forage but they will be happy if contained. They are robust, can tolerate low temperatures well and they make good mothers when they occasionally go broody.

Wyandotte

Posted by Bollith Poultry on 4 November, 2011 at 8:25 Comments comments (5)

Silver Laced ~ Golden Laced ~ Silver Pencilled ~ Buff Laced Blue Wyandotte

 

  

    

   

Pros:
Fantastic Layer ~ Great Temperament ~ Attractive ~ Hardy

 

Country of Origin:
USA 

 

Approximate Weight (Hen):
3kg – 3.5kg

 

Eggs:
Average 200 eggs per year, but usually somewhere between 175-240 eggs per year.
Brown or tinted in colour
Some colours lay better than others, with the Silver-laced variety being the best layer

 

Colour Variations:
22 colour variations are recognised throughout the world including:
-Barred
-Black
-Blue
-Blue-laced
-Buff -Buff Laced
-Columbian
-Silver Laced
-Golden Laced
-White
-Partridge
-Silver Pencilled
-Mille Fleur
-Buff Columbian
-Red

 

History:
The Silver-laced version was the first Wyandotte to be produced (in New York State), by crossing a Sebright rooster with the offspring from a Silver-spangled Hamburgh male – Cochin female combination. More cross-breeding followed, involving both Light and Dark Brahma females and a Silver-pencilled Hamburgh male. Silver-laced Polands may have also been bred as a source of lacing. This breeding program lasted around 15-20 years when, finally in 1883, the result was standardised in America as the Wyandotte – named after a tribe of Native North Americans.

 

Personality:
They Wyandotte’s character is well suited to the domestic environment. They are generally calm, friendly birds, which are equally happy foraging outside or living the relative confinement.

 

Care:
Looking after Wyandottes should be a straightforward business. It is a hardy breed, which is robust and will take temperature extremes in its stride. The hens make good mothers, but be careful not to overfeed the Wyandotte and they can become quite fat!

 Bantam versions also available

Wyandotte Assoication of Australia: http://members.ozemail.com.au/~whitewyandottes/

Dorking

Posted by Bollith Poultry on 30 October, 2011 at 8:55 Comments comments (2)

Silver Grey Dorking

   

Quirks:
Docile ~ Ancient roots ~ Five toes

 

Country of Origin:
Unknown. Records suggest the breed has been around for over 2,000 years although their specific origin remains a mystery. Possibly Britain or Italy.

 

Approximate Weight (Hen):
Between 3.6kg – 4.6kgs.

 

History:
The Dorking is arguably one of our oldest breeds of domestic chicken.

Having been around at the time of the Roman invasion of Britain in AD 43, the Dorking is possibly the oldest English breed of chicken. As mentioned above the true origin of the Dorking is unknown, but some people believe the breed existed in Britain before the Romans arrived, however others suggest invaders brought it with them. During the ninth century, the Dorking was crossed with many other breeds, including the French Crevecoeur, to improve its suitability as a table bird.

With the advent of faster growing crossbred strains of laying and meat birds in the 50's and 60's, the Dorking fell into decline. It has been maintained by a few dedicated breeders, but is regarded as a critically endangered breed.

 

Eggs: 
Dorking hens will lay around 100, medium sized, white or cream coloured eggs per year, but they only lay during the spring and summer months - not all year round. 

 

Colour Variations:
-White
-Dark
-Red
-Cuckoo
-Silver -Grey

 

Appearance:
One of the best-known facts about the Dorking is that it has five toes on each foot the fifth seperate from and above the normal hind toe, pointing upward. Silver Grey, Red and Dark chicks can easily be sexed by around 2-3 weeks as their juvenile feathers come through, with the males showing a black breast and females showing salmon/chestnut breast feathering.

 

Personality:
The Dorking is a great breed for the domestic keeper, combining traditional good looks with an appealing temperament. The birds are calm and docile, easily tamed and are generally always happy to be handled.

 

Care: 
These birds enjoy foraging on a free-range basis, and they are not really happy in cramped confined conditions. They are reasonably hardy birds and the hens make good mothers. Dorking chicks can be delicate and slow to develop; they are best hatched in spring so that the warm summer can help to build up their strength for the winter.

They are one of the slower growing breeds; while pullets may come into lay as early as five months, they may not attain their full adult size until 18 months to two years old.

 

Dorking Breeder Group Australasia: www.australiandorkings.com


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